Clicky

Student Life

Jewish Life, Holidays, and Traditions

Every Jewish child is a sacred soul connecting one generation to another. Our students are imbued with Jewish values from day one. Learning Hebrew provides access to our rich tradition, and connects all Jews to the State of Israel. We help students develop a personal connection to God, and the Jewish people, through the study of Torah, prayer, our history, and teaching the rituals and traditions that elevate everyday life. Faculty and staff continually model behavior that is kind and respectful, and teach the importance of tzedakah, and making a positive difference in the world. Every aspect of our curriculum and our mission is informed by the notion that we are all created in the image of God and have a sacred purpose in life.

At Hillel, we welcome families from a wide range of Jewish backgrounds and affiliations, and we respect the variances in thought and practice that come from authentic self-expression. We also uphold Jewish unity. As a community Jewish day school, Hillel is committed to the observance of Halachah. Both Hillel families and the school work together to create a welcoming community filled with respect for different levels of religious practice.  

Our policies on kashrut, dress, derech eretz (respect), and other Jewish values are meant to ensure that every student feels comfortable and welcome at communal functions such as birthday parties and Bar/Bat Mitzvah celebrations. We hope that this atmosphere of respect will help students perform mitzvot, and thus deepen their relationship with God. Therefore, Hillel families, regardless of personal practices, are expected to abide by these standards when planning events involving the Hillel community.

At Hillel, hands-on Jewish holiday learning creates lifelong Jewish memories.

Whether creating his own family shield while learning about the Maccabees or using a laser cutter to make Esther and Mordechai dolls to act out a scene from Purim, our Jewish holidays come alive at school with joy and meaning! In the weeks leading up to a holiday, our learning communities blossom with artwork and decorations, and resound with holiday music. Our younger students learn holiday mitzvot and traditions, and our older students study sources from the Torah, Mishnah and Talmud to add depth and sophistication to their understanding. 

The best holiday learning is experiential. Our students visit our school’s sukkah to wave the lulav and etrog; they dress up for Purim, learn to read megillah, and enjoy a Purim carnival; they study the haggadah, and go home to help lead the seder; they observe Yom Hazikaron (Israel’s Memorial Day) with solemnity and gratitude, and Yom Ha-atzma’ut (Israel Independence Day) with celebration and joy. 

Annual traditions such as the First Grade Siddur Party, the Second Grade Torah Party, and the Fifth Grade Bracha Bee evoke cherished memories long after the celebration ends, and begin to forge the deep sense of connection to Jews around the world and through the generations that is core to every Hillel graduate.

Vadim Matatov, current parent

After touring your school today, my wife and I felt this would be the perfect place where eventually both of our kids would excel. Knowing our children and how happy they are when they are able to learn and discover new things would fit perfectly into your school model. The way teachers engage the children and the way children are engage with the teachers is very important to us. Seeing the kids sing morning prayers this morning was something that I know our kids would definitely enjoy. Our goal for them in your school would be to become knowable, productive, and caring member of the community. As a family we approach Judaism in a very traditional way by having Shabbat dinners, celebrating Holidays, and occasionally attending services and Chabad of Commerce.
 

List of 6 items.

  • isacs

  • ism

  • jewish federation

  • naeyc

  • nais

  • prizmah

Hillel Day School of Metropolitan Detroit
32200 Middlebelt Road | Farmington Hills, MI 48334

Olark